The Content Of The Peace Agreement

The second type of organizational/institutional component is intended to resolve subsequent/future conflicts on substantive issues such as the abuse of state power over human rights and the promotion of transparency and accountability in governance. These mechanisms, often referred to as “peacebuilding mechanisms” in the United Nations, help to promote the culture of peaceful conflict resolution in a society and public confidence in the State`s ability to resolve future problems in a systematic and impartial manner. The terms “comprehensive agreements” and “Framework Agreements” are often used synonymously. There is, however, a small difference between the two types of agreements: phase 4: scenario and negotiation Once the parties have decided to work together on a common solution, citizens and officials will adopt two different approaches, dialogue and sustainable negotiations. They also target two distinct but complementary products, each of which reflects certain skills and roles. Citizens will aspire to a change of relationship that will allow them to cooperate in a consensual way in the whole of society. Officials will seek a formal and written agreement. This element set out the fundamental ideas of understanding the nature of peace agreements. Much remains to be said. Other elements of this group add more information.

The following section deals immediately with the substantive provisions of peace agreements, in particular the types of agreements that can reduce intractable conflicts. In any long-running violent conflict, transgressions against justice are inevitable. Peace agreements must be structured in such a way as to recognize these offences and, in most cases, to bring justice to the victims. Michelle Maiese`s “Addressing Injustice” section defines a framework for categorizing injustice and then strategies to address injustice in the structure of peace agreements. Phase 5: Acting together to implement agreements The implementation of agreements is often seen as a series of steps to be taken. It is less often seen as part of a long-term political process aimed at changing relations, in which negotiations are just an event. . . .